Homestuck Andrew Hussie | Download PDF

Andrew Hussie


After spending roughly about two years listening to friends talk incessantly in mysterious lingo about strangely named characters and places, and having had the premise of Homestuck explained to me more times than I can recount, I ended up being rather thoroughly "spoiled," so to speak, on many broad terms. I knew that it was a trippy combination of literature, visuals, animation, and sound. I knew that despite its mundane and unassuming beginning, it expanded to fill an overwhelmingly complex creation mythology involving a video game. In short, while I did not for a long time have any desire to read it, I developed a basic, and purely academic understanding and appreciation for this mysterious webcomic. Webcomics have always been of interest to me, ever since reading Scott McCloud's lesser known book Reinventing Comics, which, amongst many other things, hypothesizes on the influence that the Internet, with all its possibilities for new formats and media, might have on future storytellers. And boy, oh boy, does Homestuck (and MSPA in general) take advantage of everything the Internet has to offer–from the hilarious and the awful, the vulgar and the sacred, the humorous and heart-wrenching. I could talk all day about the formal construction (and deconstruction) of Homestuck, and indeed many already have. I knew many facts about Homestuck before I started reading it, and thought that would be enough to appreciate its formal contributions to the Internet Age of storytelling.

But to concentrate merely on the format of a comic is to miss out on another supremely important thing: the story. I have finally caught up to this Behemoth of a webcomic. I do not choose my words in vain, for a Behemoth it is–it is a savage and hyperbolic work that, like the mysterious beast of the Bible, cannot be easily snared by the pigeonholes of genre and medium. But unlike some experimental work that eschew story and character development for the sake of merely exploring interesting structure, Homestuck has a lot of heart.

And what exactly is it saying? For all the crazy and far-fetched situations, a lot of the interactions between the kids and trolls seemed to me like a surprisingly accurate portrayal of how young teens would probably act, if provided with various superpowers, plenty of weapons, left without adult supervision, and given the opportunity to create a universe. The petty bickering, the compulsive swearing, the hormone-induced awkwardness, and the sense of disorientation in unknown environments is something straight out of my middle school observations. Friendships thrive or falter over time while juvenile attempts at romance make matters more complicated. Overall, the story continually emphasizes how relationships, both positive and negative, are absolutely necessary for surviving the hard path to maturity. Those who refuse to cooperate and who alienate themselves, whether out of arrogance, anger, or selfishness, risk destruction for themselves as well as for their compatriots.

And a whole lot of this is mostly conveyed through literally watching kids talk to each other. Being this dialogue-heavy could easily become a tiresome crutch for other visually-heavy mediums, but it succeeds brilliantly here. Homestuck is one of the two best comics I know (the other one being Gunnerkrigg Court by Tom Siddell ) at developing the elusive thing called voice. The ways in which characters speak, banter, argue with, and insult one another with various levels of sincerity help define and distinguish their relationships with each other early on, with each character's vocabulary, speech patterns and mannerisms doing a wonderful job of revealing the nature of the characters even before their names, genders, or appearances are revealed. The struggle to communicate and understand one another, despite culture barriers and conflicts in personality, is a message that has an interesting context in an extremely digitized age such as the one we live in today, where we may become close friends with people who live halfway across the world while knowing nothing of the people we live right next to.

So will (or should) everyone enjoy Homestuck? Asking that question is like asking if everyone will enjoy The Odyssey Of course it's not everyone's cup of tea. But that doesn't mean everyone can't learn something from it. True, it's long and it's eclectic and impossible to discuss in public without sounding like you're speaking a foreign language. True, members of the fandom can be haughty, exclusive, immature, and borderline cultlike. I'm not trying to evangelize it to everyone, but rather to briefly explain a bit of its literary and personal significance in layman's terms. Whatever your preferences are, there is value I heartily concur with the words of Bryan Lee O'Malley (Scott Pilgrim series creator): "It's well-written and thoughtful. It has things to say. It's not for everyone, but it's as well worth your time as any other comic I can think of." At the very least, even if you steadfastly dislike it for whatever reason, you can still, as I did at first, simply appreciate it on its experimental nature and contribution to modern storytelling, in the same way that people who dislike Mondrian and James Joyce can still appreciate their contributions to art and literature respectively. People's tastes vary greatly, and some may begrudge its massive religious following, but if you ask me, any work as, witty, creative, emotionally complex, and lovingly crafted as Homestuck, which by the way has been made available to the general public for absolutely no charge, deserves the deluge of the attention and kudos that it already has.


8124

And since you don't actually get any reserves now until you complete all of the main tiers it would be really bad if a homestuck bunch of the best stuff required you to first complete the operation and then get lucky in loot boxes. Yeah i will for sure my current cpu is ik with a gtx and 16gig of homestuck "slow" ram mhz this is a major upgrade with a new cpu and motherboard and ram. The bags homestuck work with the corresponding transit slide locks. My daughter was concerned it was not free and so i called andrew hussie reception from the room to be told it was included in our resort fee! The azusa street revival lasted from until, but the pentecostal andrew hussie movement and the restoration of the baptism of the holy spirit accompanied by the gift of tongues spread all over the world from there. Where these companies differ is in how much of the genome they assess and whether they look for only a limited set of known andrew hussie variants or can uncover new ones specific to an individual. We offer our users homestuck a package of total life-cycle support, providing maintenance, repair and engineering services, logistics information, product support, training and field support. A place of homestuck their own — employment opportunities are often limited in the philippines for people with dwarfism. Note: before relying on the information in this andrew hussie table for any purpose, including in calculating pre-judgment and post-judgment interest, users should independently verify its accuracy, currency and completeness.

But, the most amazing gluten free homestuck vanilla cake mix is by orgran. Quote: originally posted by homestuck polux that thing about the best is a relative one. Can not really understand this, my rahu period andrew hussie during moon mahadasha was also very hard. What would happen if you put a line homestuck through that diamond? Because molluscum contagiosum usually resolves without treatment and treatment options can cause discomfort to children, homestuck initial recommendations are often to simply wait for the lesions to resolve on their own. He served until his death in adams died from andrew hussie a stroke in washington, d. Now just plug homestuck in your function so that every cell is a function of the one next to it. The unshift method returns the new length of the andrew hussie array after the item is added. andrew hussie instead, the thumb works around the neck of the instrument to sit at the point at which the neck meets the right bout of the body, and remains there while the fingers move between the high positions. Traveling the world, andrew hussie being with friends, being outside all the time, being physical — all those things are priceless. The second derivatives of the homestuck energy are calculated as numerical derivatives of analytical gradients. You will need to specify the culture in the aspx homestuck markup page.

Format: pdf, epub, fb2, txt,audiobook
Download ebook:
Homestuck.pdf
Homestuck.txt
Homestuck.epub
Homestuck.fb2
Download audiobook:
Homestuck.mp3

Homestuck book

He was against Dumbledore when Homestuck he said that only because he loved Lily.

In this tutorial, Stephen Walther explains how you can Homestuck easily defeat these types of attacks by HTML encoding your content.

A homevideo Homestuck shows, how the policemen beat up the guy as well as the medics just binding him to the floor, keeping him down with their feet and missing out on reanimation.

The core issue is not where they are coming from but Homestuck what they bring to the table.

It's basically like a fun mini-game, and it can also earn you a star in your trainer card Q. Homestuck

Homestuck Pliny the Elder has the most to say about the Padus of his times.


after spending roughly about two years listening to friends talk incessantly in mysterious lingo about strangely named characters and places, and having had the premise of homestuck explained to me more times than i can recount, i ended up being rather thoroughly "spoiled," so to speak, on many broad terms. i knew that it was a trippy combination of literature, visuals, animation, and sound. i knew that despite its mundane and unassuming beginning, it expanded to fill an overwhelmingly complex creation mythology involving a video game. in short, while i did not for a long time have any desire to read it, i developed a basic, and purely academic understanding and appreciation for this mysterious webcomic. webcomics have always been of interest to me, ever since reading scott mccloud's lesser known book reinventing comics, which, amongst many other things, hypothesizes on the influence that the internet, with all its possibilities for new formats and media, might have on future storytellers. and boy, oh boy, does homestuck (and mspa in general) take advantage of everything the internet has to offer–from the hilarious and the awful, the vulgar and the sacred, the humorous and heart-wrenching. i could talk all day about the formal construction (and deconstruction) of homestuck, and indeed many already have. i knew many facts about homestuck before i started reading it, and thought that would be enough to appreciate its formal contributions to the internet age of storytelling.

but to concentrate merely on the format of a comic is to miss out on another supremely important thing: the story. i have finally caught up to this behemoth of a webcomic. i do not choose my words in vain, for a behemoth it is–it is a savage and hyperbolic work that, like the mysterious beast of the bible, cannot be easily snared by the pigeonholes of genre and medium. but unlike some experimental work that eschew story and character development for the sake of merely exploring interesting structure, homestuck has a lot of heart.

and what exactly is it saying? for all the crazy and far-fetched situations, a lot of the interactions between the kids and trolls seemed to me like a surprisingly accurate portrayal of how young teens would probably act, if provided with various superpowers, plenty of weapons, left without adult supervision, and given the opportunity to create a universe. the petty bickering, the compulsive swearing, the hormone-induced awkwardness, and the sense of disorientation in unknown environments is something straight out of my middle school observations. friendships thrive or falter over time while juvenile attempts at romance make matters more complicated. overall, the story continually emphasizes how relationships, both positive and negative, are absolutely necessary for surviving the hard path to maturity. those who refuse to cooperate and who alienate themselves, whether out of arrogance, anger, or selfishness, risk destruction for themselves as well as for their compatriots.

and a whole lot of this is mostly conveyed through literally watching kids talk to each other. being this dialogue-heavy could easily become a tiresome crutch for other visually-heavy mediums, but it succeeds brilliantly here. homestuck is one of the two best comics i know (the other one being gunnerkrigg court by tom siddell ) at developing the elusive thing called voice. the ways in which characters speak, banter, argue with, and insult one another with various levels of sincerity help define and distinguish their relationships with each other early on, with each character's vocabulary, speech patterns and mannerisms doing a wonderful job of revealing the nature of the characters even before their names, genders, or appearances are revealed. the struggle to communicate and understand one another, despite culture barriers and conflicts in personality, is a message that has an interesting context in an extremely digitized age such as the one we live in today, where we may become close friends with people who live halfway across the world while knowing nothing of the people we live right next to.

so will (or should) everyone enjoy homestuck? asking that question is like asking if everyone will enjoy the odyssey of course it's not everyone's cup of tea. but that doesn't mean everyone can't learn something from it. true, it's long and it's eclectic and impossible to discuss in public without sounding like you're speaking a foreign language. true, members of the fandom can be haughty, exclusive, immature, and borderline cultlike. i'm not trying to evangelize it to everyone, but rather to briefly explain a bit of its literary and personal significance in layman's terms. whatever your preferences are, there is value i heartily concur with the words of bryan lee o'malley (scott pilgrim series creator): "it's well-written and thoughtful. it has things to say. it's not for everyone, but it's as well worth your time as any other comic i can think of." at the very least, even if you steadfastly dislike it for whatever reason, you can still, as i did at first, simply appreciate it on its experimental nature and contribution to modern storytelling, in the same way that people who dislike mondrian and james joyce can still appreciate their contributions to art and literature respectively. people's tastes vary greatly, and some may begrudge its massive religious following, but if you ask me, any work as, witty, creative, emotionally complex, and lovingly crafted as homestuck, which by the way has been made available to the general public for absolutely no charge, deserves the deluge of the attention and kudos that it already has.


both products provide field workers with the necessary tools to access information remotely, that otherwise they would only be able to access back in the office or on paper. If the attacker suffers any combat loss, the first step comes from the mountain unit declared for that combat. Beyond that, he cautions that the geologic record is full of unexpected shifts in tectonic activity that
after spending roughly about two years listening to friends talk incessantly in mysterious lingo about strangely named characters and places, and having had the premise of homestuck explained to me more times than i can recount, i ended up being rather thoroughly "spoiled," so to speak, on many broad terms. i knew that it was a trippy combination of literature, visuals, animation, and sound. i knew that despite its mundane and unassuming beginning, it expanded to fill an overwhelmingly complex creation mythology involving a video game. in short, while i did not for a long time have any desire to read it, i developed a basic, and purely academic understanding and appreciation for this mysterious webcomic. webcomics have always been of interest to me, ever since reading scott mccloud's lesser known book reinventing comics, which, amongst many other things, hypothesizes on the influence that the internet, with all its possibilities for new formats and media, might have on future storytellers. and boy, oh boy, does homestuck (and mspa in general) take advantage of everything the internet has to offer–from the hilarious and the awful, the vulgar and the sacred, the humorous and heart-wrenching. i could talk all day about the formal construction (and deconstruction) of homestuck, and indeed many already have. i knew many facts about homestuck before i started reading it, and thought that would be enough to appreciate its formal contributions to the internet age of storytelling.

but to concentrate merely on the format of a comic is to miss out on another supremely important thing: the story. i have finally caught up to this behemoth of a webcomic. i do not choose my words in vain, for a behemoth it is–it is a savage and hyperbolic work that, like the mysterious beast of the bible, cannot be easily snared by the pigeonholes of genre and medium. but unlike some experimental work that eschew story and character development for the sake of merely exploring interesting structure, homestuck has a lot of heart.

and what exactly is it saying? for all the crazy and far-fetched situations, a lot of the interactions between the kids and trolls seemed to me like a surprisingly accurate portrayal of how young teens would probably act, if provided with various superpowers, plenty of weapons, left without adult supervision, and given the opportunity to create a universe. the petty bickering, the compulsive swearing, the hormone-induced awkwardness, and the sense of disorientation in unknown environments is something straight out of my middle school observations. friendships thrive or falter over time while juvenile attempts at romance make matters more complicated. overall, the story continually emphasizes how relationships, both positive and negative, are absolutely necessary for surviving the hard path to maturity. those who refuse to cooperate and who alienate themselves, whether out of arrogance, anger, or selfishness, risk destruction for themselves as well as for their compatriots.

and a whole lot of this is mostly conveyed through literally watching kids talk to each other. being this dialogue-heavy could easily become a tiresome crutch for other visually-heavy mediums, but it succeeds brilliantly here. homestuck is one of the two best comics i know (the other one being gunnerkrigg court by tom siddell ) at developing the elusive thing called voice. the ways in which characters speak, banter, argue with, and insult one another with various levels of sincerity help define and distinguish their relationships with each other early on, with each character's vocabulary, speech patterns and mannerisms doing a wonderful job of revealing the nature of the characters even before their names, genders, or appearances are revealed. the struggle to communicate and understand one another, despite culture barriers and conflicts in personality, is a message that has an interesting context in an extremely digitized age such as the one we live in today, where we may become close friends with people who live halfway across the world while knowing nothing of the people we live right next to.

so will (or should) everyone enjoy homestuck? asking that question is like asking if everyone will enjoy the odyssey of course it's not everyone's cup of tea. but that doesn't mean everyone can't learn something from it. true, it's long and it's eclectic and impossible to discuss in public without sounding like you're speaking a foreign language. true, members of the fandom can be haughty, exclusive, immature, and borderline cultlike. i'm not trying to evangelize it to everyone, but rather to briefly explain a bit of its literary and personal significance in layman's terms. whatever your preferences are, there is value i heartily concur with the words of bryan lee o'malley (scott pilgrim series creator): "it's well-written and thoughtful. it has things to say. it's not for everyone, but it's as well worth your time as any other comic i can think of." at the very least, even if you steadfastly dislike it for whatever reason, you can still, as i did at first, simply appreciate it on its experimental nature and contribution to modern storytelling, in the same way that people who dislike mondrian and james joyce can still appreciate their contributions to art and literature respectively. people's tastes vary greatly, and some may begrudge its massive religious following, but if you ask me, any work as, witty, creative, emotionally complex, and lovingly crafted as homestuck, which by the way has been made available to the general public for absolutely no charge, deserves the deluge of the attention and kudos that it already has.


make further projections "very, very speculative". If you are in poor mobile coverage area, try to find better coverage area.
after spending roughly about two years listening to friends talk incessantly in mysterious lingo about strangely named characters and places, and having had the premise of homestuck explained to me more times than i can recount, i ended up being rather thoroughly "spoiled," so to speak, on many broad terms. i knew that it was a trippy combination of literature, visuals, animation, and sound. i knew that despite its mundane and unassuming beginning, it expanded to fill an overwhelmingly complex creation mythology involving a video game. in short, while i did not for a long time have any desire to read it, i developed a basic, and purely academic understanding and appreciation for this mysterious webcomic. webcomics have always been of interest to me, ever since reading scott mccloud's lesser known book reinventing comics, which, amongst many other things, hypothesizes on the influence that the internet, with all its possibilities for new formats and media, might have on future storytellers. and boy, oh boy, does homestuck (and mspa in general) take advantage of everything the internet has to offer–from the hilarious and the awful, the vulgar and the sacred, the humorous and heart-wrenching. i could talk all day about the formal construction (and deconstruction) of homestuck, and indeed many already have. i knew many facts about homestuck before i started reading it, and thought that would be enough to appreciate its formal contributions to the internet age of storytelling.

but to concentrate merely on the format of a comic is to miss out on another supremely important thing: the story. i have finally caught up to this behemoth of a webcomic. i do not choose my words in vain, for a behemoth it is–it is a savage and hyperbolic work that, like the mysterious beast of the bible, cannot be easily snared by the pigeonholes of genre and medium. but unlike some experimental work that eschew story and character development for the sake of merely exploring interesting structure, homestuck has a lot of heart.

and what exactly is it saying? for all the crazy and far-fetched situations, a lot of the interactions between the kids and trolls seemed to me like a surprisingly accurate portrayal of how young teens would probably act, if provided with various superpowers, plenty of weapons, left without adult supervision, and given the opportunity to create a universe. the petty bickering, the compulsive swearing, the hormone-induced awkwardness, and the sense of disorientation in unknown environments is something straight out of my middle school observations. friendships thrive or falter over time while juvenile attempts at romance make matters more complicated. overall, the story continually emphasizes how relationships, both positive and negative, are absolutely necessary for surviving the hard path to maturity. those who refuse to cooperate and who alienate themselves, whether out of arrogance, anger, or selfishness, risk destruction for themselves as well as for their compatriots.

and a whole lot of this is mostly conveyed through literally watching kids talk to each other. being this dialogue-heavy could easily become a tiresome crutch for other visually-heavy mediums, but it succeeds brilliantly here. homestuck is one of the two best comics i know (the other one being gunnerkrigg court by tom siddell ) at developing the elusive thing called voice. the ways in which characters speak, banter, argue with, and insult one another with various levels of sincerity help define and distinguish their relationships with each other early on, with each character's vocabulary, speech patterns and mannerisms doing a wonderful job of revealing the nature of the characters even before their names, genders, or appearances are revealed. the struggle to communicate and understand one another, despite culture barriers and conflicts in personality, is a message that has an interesting context in an extremely digitized age such as the one we live in today, where we may become close friends with people who live halfway across the world while knowing nothing of the people we live right next to.

so will (or should) everyone enjoy homestuck? asking that question is like asking if everyone will enjoy the odyssey of course it's not everyone's cup of tea. but that doesn't mean everyone can't learn something from it. true, it's long and it's eclectic and impossible to discuss in public without sounding like you're speaking a foreign language. true, members of the fandom can be haughty, exclusive, immature, and borderline cultlike. i'm not trying to evangelize it to everyone, but rather to briefly explain a bit of its literary and personal significance in layman's terms. whatever your preferences are, there is value i heartily concur with the words of bryan lee o'malley (scott pilgrim series creator): "it's well-written and thoughtful. it has things to say. it's not for everyone, but it's as well worth your time as any other comic i can think of." at the very least, even if you steadfastly dislike it for whatever reason, you can still, as i did at first, simply appreciate it on its experimental nature and contribution to modern storytelling, in the same way that people who dislike mondrian and james joyce can still appreciate their contributions to art and literature respectively. people's tastes vary greatly, and some may begrudge its massive religious following, but if you ask me, any work as, witty, creative, emotionally complex, and lovingly crafted as homestuck, which by the way has been made available to the general public for absolutely no charge, deserves the deluge of the attention and kudos that it already has.


Since the material feed, for example, cannot be stabilized at will, the application quality depends on the continuous inline monitoring of the coating thickness. The mouth movements had to be entirely computer-generated in order to synchronise with the sound. Eco-friendliness although this list is suppose to show the differences between
after spending roughly about two years listening to friends talk incessantly in mysterious lingo about strangely named characters and places, and having had the premise of homestuck explained to me more times than i can recount, i ended up being rather thoroughly "spoiled," so to speak, on many broad terms. i knew that it was a trippy combination of literature, visuals, animation, and sound. i knew that despite its mundane and unassuming beginning, it expanded to fill an overwhelmingly complex creation mythology involving a video game. in short, while i did not for a long time have any desire to read it, i developed a basic, and purely academic understanding and appreciation for this mysterious webcomic. webcomics have always been of interest to me, ever since reading scott mccloud's lesser known book reinventing comics, which, amongst many other things, hypothesizes on the influence that the internet, with all its possibilities for new formats and media, might have on future storytellers. and boy, oh boy, does homestuck (and mspa in general) take advantage of everything the internet has to offer–from the hilarious and the awful, the vulgar and the sacred, the humorous and heart-wrenching. i could talk all day about the formal construction (and deconstruction) of homestuck, and indeed many already have. i knew many facts about homestuck before i started reading it, and thought that would be enough to appreciate its formal contributions to the internet age of storytelling.

but to concentrate merely on the format of a comic is to miss out on another supremely important thing: the story. i have finally caught up to this behemoth of a webcomic. i do not choose my words in vain, for a behemoth it is–it is a savage and hyperbolic work that, like the mysterious beast of the bible, cannot be easily snared by the pigeonholes of genre and medium. but unlike some experimental work that eschew story and character development for the sake of merely exploring interesting structure, homestuck has a lot of heart.

and what exactly is it saying? for all the crazy and far-fetched situations, a lot of the interactions between the kids and trolls seemed to me like a surprisingly accurate portrayal of how young teens would probably act, if provided with various superpowers, plenty of weapons, left without adult supervision, and given the opportunity to create a universe. the petty bickering, the compulsive swearing, the hormone-induced awkwardness, and the sense of disorientation in unknown environments is something straight out of my middle school observations. friendships thrive or falter over time while juvenile attempts at romance make matters more complicated. overall, the story continually emphasizes how relationships, both positive and negative, are absolutely necessary for surviving the hard path to maturity. those who refuse to cooperate and who alienate themselves, whether out of arrogance, anger, or selfishness, risk destruction for themselves as well as for their compatriots.

and a whole lot of this is mostly conveyed through literally watching kids talk to each other. being this dialogue-heavy could easily become a tiresome crutch for other visually-heavy mediums, but it succeeds brilliantly here. homestuck is one of the two best comics i know (the other one being gunnerkrigg court by tom siddell ) at developing the elusive thing called voice. the ways in which characters speak, banter, argue with, and insult one another with various levels of sincerity help define and distinguish their relationships with each other early on, with each character's vocabulary, speech patterns and mannerisms doing a wonderful job of revealing the nature of the characters even before their names, genders, or appearances are revealed. the struggle to communicate and understand one another, despite culture barriers and conflicts in personality, is a message that has an interesting context in an extremely digitized age such as the one we live in today, where we may become close friends with people who live halfway across the world while knowing nothing of the people we live right next to.

so will (or should) everyone enjoy homestuck? asking that question is like asking if everyone will enjoy the odyssey of course it's not everyone's cup of tea. but that doesn't mean everyone can't learn something from it. true, it's long and it's eclectic and impossible to discuss in public without sounding like you're speaking a foreign language. true, members of the fandom can be haughty, exclusive, immature, and borderline cultlike. i'm not trying to evangelize it to everyone, but rather to briefly explain a bit of its literary and personal significance in layman's terms. whatever your preferences are, there is value i heartily concur with the words of bryan lee o'malley (scott pilgrim series creator): "it's well-written and thoughtful. it has things to say. it's not for everyone, but it's as well worth your time as any other comic i can think of." at the very least, even if you steadfastly dislike it for whatever reason, you can still, as i did at first, simply appreciate it on its experimental nature and contribution to modern storytelling, in the same way that people who dislike mondrian and james joyce can still appreciate their contributions to art and literature respectively. people's tastes vary greatly, and some may begrudge its massive religious following, but if you ask me, any work as, witty, creative, emotionally complex, and lovingly crafted as homestuck, which by the way has been made available to the general public for absolutely no charge, deserves the deluge of the attention and kudos that it already has.


redwood and cedar, these species are very similar when it comes to being eco-friendly. At its
after spending roughly about two years listening to friends talk incessantly in mysterious lingo about strangely named characters and places, and having had the premise of homestuck explained to me more times than i can recount, i ended up being rather thoroughly "spoiled," so to speak, on many broad terms. i knew that it was a trippy combination of literature, visuals, animation, and sound. i knew that despite its mundane and unassuming beginning, it expanded to fill an overwhelmingly complex creation mythology involving a video game. in short, while i did not for a long time have any desire to read it, i developed a basic, and purely academic understanding and appreciation for this mysterious webcomic. webcomics have always been of interest to me, ever since reading scott mccloud's lesser known book reinventing comics, which, amongst many other things, hypothesizes on the influence that the internet, with all its possibilities for new formats and media, might have on future storytellers. and boy, oh boy, does homestuck (and mspa in general) take advantage of everything the internet has to offer–from the hilarious and the awful, the vulgar and the sacred, the humorous and heart-wrenching. i could talk all day about the formal construction (and deconstruction) of homestuck, and indeed many already have. i knew many facts about homestuck before i started reading it, and thought that would be enough to appreciate its formal contributions to the internet age of storytelling.

but to concentrate merely on the format of a comic is to miss out on another supremely important thing: the story. i have finally caught up to this behemoth of a webcomic. i do not choose my words in vain, for a behemoth it is–it is a savage and hyperbolic work that, like the mysterious beast of the bible, cannot be easily snared by the pigeonholes of genre and medium. but unlike some experimental work that eschew story and character development for the sake of merely exploring interesting structure, homestuck has a lot of heart.

and what exactly is it saying? for all the crazy and far-fetched situations, a lot of the interactions between the kids and trolls seemed to me like a surprisingly accurate portrayal of how young teens would probably act, if provided with various superpowers, plenty of weapons, left without adult supervision, and given the opportunity to create a universe. the petty bickering, the compulsive swearing, the hormone-induced awkwardness, and the sense of disorientation in unknown environments is something straight out of my middle school observations. friendships thrive or falter over time while juvenile attempts at romance make matters more complicated. overall, the story continually emphasizes how relationships, both positive and negative, are absolutely necessary for surviving the hard path to maturity. those who refuse to cooperate and who alienate themselves, whether out of arrogance, anger, or selfishness, risk destruction for themselves as well as for their compatriots.

and a whole lot of this is mostly conveyed through literally watching kids talk to each other. being this dialogue-heavy could easily become a tiresome crutch for other visually-heavy mediums, but it succeeds brilliantly here. homestuck is one of the two best comics i know (the other one being gunnerkrigg court by tom siddell ) at developing the elusive thing called voice. the ways in which characters speak, banter, argue with, and insult one another with various levels of sincerity help define and distinguish their relationships with each other early on, with each character's vocabulary, speech patterns and mannerisms doing a wonderful job of revealing the nature of the characters even before their names, genders, or appearances are revealed. the struggle to communicate and understand one another, despite culture barriers and conflicts in personality, is a message that has an interesting context in an extremely digitized age such as the one we live in today, where we may become close friends with people who live halfway across the world while knowing nothing of the people we live right next to.

so will (or should) everyone enjoy homestuck? asking that question is like asking if everyone will enjoy the odyssey of course it's not everyone's cup of tea. but that doesn't mean everyone can't learn something from it. true, it's long and it's eclectic and impossible to discuss in public without sounding like you're speaking a foreign language. true, members of the fandom can be haughty, exclusive, immature, and borderline cultlike. i'm not trying to evangelize it to everyone, but rather to briefly explain a bit of its literary and personal significance in layman's terms. whatever your preferences are, there is value i heartily concur with the words of bryan lee o'malley (scott pilgrim series creator): "it's well-written and thoughtful. it has things to say. it's not for everyone, but it's as well worth your time as any other comic i can think of." at the very least, even if you steadfastly dislike it for whatever reason, you can still, as i did at first, simply appreciate it on its experimental nature and contribution to modern storytelling, in the same way that people who dislike mondrian and james joyce can still appreciate their contributions to art and literature respectively. people's tastes vary greatly, and some may begrudge its massive religious following, but if you ask me, any work as, witty, creative, emotionally complex, and lovingly crafted as homestuck, which by the way has been made available to the general public for absolutely no charge, deserves the deluge of the attention and kudos that it already has.


steel structure production facility at hutnicza bending to any shape with maximum dimensions of: circumference cal enginering certificates for operation and supervision. And as well as engaging regulators and ministers, he has 8124 started to involve some heavyweight aeronautical executives, including one ex-nasa aviation expert. High efficiency switch-mode
after spending roughly about two years listening to friends talk incessantly in mysterious lingo about strangely named characters and places, and having had the premise of homestuck explained to me more times than i can recount, i ended up being rather thoroughly "spoiled," so to speak, on many broad terms. i knew that it was a trippy combination of literature, visuals, animation, and sound. i knew that despite its mundane and unassuming beginning, it expanded to fill an overwhelmingly complex creation mythology involving a video game. in short, while i did not for a long time have any desire to read it, i developed a basic, and purely academic understanding and appreciation for this mysterious webcomic. webcomics have always been of interest to me, ever since reading scott mccloud's lesser known book reinventing comics, which, amongst many other things, hypothesizes on the influence that the internet, with all its possibilities for new formats and media, might have on future storytellers. and boy, oh boy, does homestuck (and mspa in general) take advantage of everything the internet has to offer–from the hilarious and the awful, the vulgar and the sacred, the humorous and heart-wrenching. i could talk all day about the formal construction (and deconstruction) of homestuck, and indeed many already have. i knew many facts about homestuck before i started reading it, and thought that would be enough to appreciate its formal contributions to the internet age of storytelling.

but to concentrate merely on the format of a comic is to miss out on another supremely important thing: the story. i have finally caught up to this behemoth of a webcomic. i do not choose my words in vain, for a behemoth it is–it is a savage and hyperbolic work that, like the mysterious beast of the bible, cannot be easily snared by the pigeonholes of genre and medium. but unlike some experimental work that eschew story and character development for the sake of merely exploring interesting structure, homestuck has a lot of heart.

and what exactly is it saying? for all the crazy and far-fetched situations, a lot of the interactions between the kids and trolls seemed to me like a surprisingly accurate portrayal of how young teens would probably act, if provided with various superpowers, plenty of weapons, left without adult supervision, and given the opportunity to create a universe. the petty bickering, the compulsive swearing, the hormone-induced awkwardness, and the sense of disorientation in unknown environments is something straight out of my middle school observations. friendships thrive or falter over time while juvenile attempts at romance make matters more complicated. overall, the story continually emphasizes how relationships, both positive and negative, are absolutely necessary for surviving the hard path to maturity. those who refuse to cooperate and who alienate themselves, whether out of arrogance, anger, or selfishness, risk destruction for themselves as well as for their compatriots.

and a whole lot of this is mostly conveyed through literally watching kids talk to each other. being this dialogue-heavy could easily become a tiresome crutch for other visually-heavy mediums, but it succeeds brilliantly here. homestuck is one of the two best comics i know (the other one being gunnerkrigg court by tom siddell ) at developing the elusive thing called voice. the ways in which characters speak, banter, argue with, and insult one another with various levels of sincerity help define and distinguish their relationships with each other early on, with each character's vocabulary, speech patterns and mannerisms doing a wonderful job of revealing the nature of the characters even before their names, genders, or appearances are revealed. the struggle to communicate and understand one another, despite culture barriers and conflicts in personality, is a message that has an interesting context in an extremely digitized age such as the one we live in today, where we may become close friends with people who live halfway across the world while knowing nothing of the people we live right next to.

so will (or should) everyone enjoy homestuck? asking that question is like asking if everyone will enjoy the odyssey of course it's not everyone's cup of tea. but that doesn't mean everyone can't learn something from it. true, it's long and it's eclectic and impossible to discuss in public without sounding like you're speaking a foreign language. true, members of the fandom can be haughty, exclusive, immature, and borderline cultlike. i'm not trying to evangelize it to everyone, but rather to briefly explain a bit of its literary and personal significance in layman's terms. whatever your preferences are, there is value i heartily concur with the words of bryan lee o'malley (scott pilgrim series creator): "it's well-written and thoughtful. it has things to say. it's not for everyone, but it's as well worth your time as any other comic i can think of." at the very least, even if you steadfastly dislike it for whatever reason, you can still, as i did at first, simply appreciate it on its experimental nature and contribution to modern storytelling, in the same way that people who dislike mondrian and james joyce can still appreciate their contributions to art and literature respectively. people's tastes vary greatly, and some may begrudge its massive religious following, but if you ask me, any work as, witty, creative, emotionally complex, and lovingly crafted as homestuck, which by the way has been made available to the general public for absolutely no charge, deserves the deluge of the attention and kudos that it already has.


with low stand-by power drain. Our experts take pride in the work
after spending roughly about two years listening to friends talk incessantly in mysterious lingo about strangely named characters and places, and having had the premise of homestuck explained to me more times than i can recount, i ended up being rather thoroughly "spoiled," so to speak, on many broad terms. i knew that it was a trippy combination of literature, visuals, animation, and sound. i knew that despite its mundane and unassuming beginning, it expanded to fill an overwhelmingly complex creation mythology involving a video game. in short, while i did not for a long time have any desire to read it, i developed a basic, and purely academic understanding and appreciation for this mysterious webcomic. webcomics have always been of interest to me, ever since reading scott mccloud's lesser known book reinventing comics, which, amongst many other things, hypothesizes on the influence that the internet, with all its possibilities for new formats and media, might have on future storytellers. and boy, oh boy, does homestuck (and mspa in general) take advantage of everything the internet has to offer–from the hilarious and the awful, the vulgar and the sacred, the humorous and heart-wrenching. i could talk all day about the formal construction (and deconstruction) of homestuck, and indeed many already have. i knew many facts about homestuck before i started reading it, and thought that would be enough to appreciate its formal contributions to the internet age of storytelling.

but to concentrate merely on the format of a comic is to miss out on another supremely important thing: the story. i have finally caught up to this behemoth of a webcomic. i do not choose my words in vain, for a behemoth it is–it is a savage and hyperbolic work that, like the mysterious beast of the bible, cannot be easily snared by the pigeonholes of genre and medium. but unlike some experimental work that eschew story and character development for the sake of merely exploring interesting structure, homestuck has a lot of heart.

and what exactly is it saying? for all the crazy and far-fetched situations, a lot of the interactions between the kids and trolls seemed to me like a surprisingly accurate portrayal of how young teens would probably act, if provided with various superpowers, plenty of weapons, left without adult supervision, and given the opportunity to create a universe. the petty bickering, the compulsive swearing, the hormone-induced awkwardness, and the sense of disorientation in unknown environments is something straight out of my middle school observations. friendships thrive or falter over time while juvenile attempts at romance make matters more complicated. overall, the story continually emphasizes how relationships, both positive and negative, are absolutely necessary for surviving the hard path to maturity. those who refuse to cooperate and who alienate themselves, whether out of arrogance, anger, or selfishness, risk destruction for themselves as well as for their compatriots.

and a whole lot of this is mostly conveyed through literally watching kids talk to each other. being this dialogue-heavy could easily become a tiresome crutch for other visually-heavy mediums, but it succeeds brilliantly here. homestuck is one of the two best comics i know (the other one being gunnerkrigg court by tom siddell ) at developing the elusive thing called voice. the ways in which characters speak, banter, argue with, and insult one another with various levels of sincerity help define and distinguish their relationships with each other early on, with each character's vocabulary, speech patterns and mannerisms doing a wonderful job of revealing the nature of the characters even before their names, genders, or appearances are revealed. the struggle to communicate and understand one another, despite culture barriers and conflicts in personality, is a message that has an interesting context in an extremely digitized age such as the one we live in today, where we may become close friends with people who live halfway across the world while knowing nothing of the people we live right next to.

so will (or should) everyone enjoy homestuck? asking that question is like asking if everyone will enjoy the odyssey of course it's not everyone's cup of tea. but that doesn't mean everyone can't learn something from it. true, it's long and it's eclectic and impossible to discuss in public without sounding like you're speaking a foreign language. true, members of the fandom can be haughty, exclusive, immature, and borderline cultlike. i'm not trying to evangelize it to everyone, but rather to briefly explain a bit of its literary and personal significance in layman's terms. whatever your preferences are, there is value i heartily concur with the words of bryan lee o'malley (scott pilgrim series creator): "it's well-written and thoughtful. it has things to say. it's not for everyone, but it's as well worth your time as any other comic i can think of." at the very least, even if you steadfastly dislike it for whatever reason, you can still, as i did at first, simply appreciate it on its experimental nature and contribution to modern storytelling, in the same way that people who dislike mondrian and james joyce can still appreciate their contributions to art and literature respectively. people's tastes vary greatly, and some may begrudge its massive religious following, but if you ask me, any work as, witty, creative, emotionally complex, and lovingly crafted as homestuck, which by the way has been made available to the general public for absolutely no charge, deserves the deluge of the attention and kudos that it already has.


we do and the products we sell. With regard to the
after spending roughly about two years listening to friends talk incessantly in mysterious lingo about strangely named characters and places, and having had the premise of homestuck explained to me more times than i can recount, i ended up being rather thoroughly "spoiled," so to speak, on many broad terms. i knew that it was a trippy combination of literature, visuals, animation, and sound. i knew that despite its mundane and unassuming beginning, it expanded to fill an overwhelmingly complex creation mythology involving a video game. in short, while i did not for a long time have any desire to read it, i developed a basic, and purely academic understanding and appreciation for this mysterious webcomic. webcomics have always been of interest to me, ever since reading scott mccloud's lesser known book reinventing comics, which, amongst many other things, hypothesizes on the influence that the internet, with all its possibilities for new formats and media, might have on future storytellers. and boy, oh boy, does homestuck (and mspa in general) take advantage of everything the internet has to offer–from the hilarious and the awful, the vulgar and the sacred, the humorous and heart-wrenching. i could talk all day about the formal construction (and deconstruction) of homestuck, and indeed many already have. i knew many facts about homestuck before i started reading it, and thought that would be enough to appreciate its formal contributions to the internet age of storytelling.

but to concentrate merely on the format of a comic is to miss out on another supremely important thing: the story. i have finally caught up to this behemoth of a webcomic. i do not choose my words in vain, for a behemoth it is–it is a savage and hyperbolic work that, like the mysterious beast of the bible, cannot be easily snared by the pigeonholes of genre and medium. but unlike some experimental work that eschew story and character development for the sake of merely exploring interesting structure, homestuck has a lot of heart.

and what exactly is it saying? for all the crazy and far-fetched situations, a lot of the interactions between the kids and trolls seemed to me like a surprisingly accurate portrayal of how young teens would probably act, if provided with various superpowers, plenty of weapons, left without adult supervision, and given the opportunity to create a universe. the petty bickering, the compulsive swearing, the hormone-induced awkwardness, and the sense of disorientation in unknown environments is something straight out of my middle school observations. friendships thrive or falter over time while juvenile attempts at romance make matters more complicated. overall, the story continually emphasizes how relationships, both positive and negative, are absolutely necessary for surviving the hard path to maturity. those who refuse to cooperate and who alienate themselves, whether out of arrogance, anger, or selfishness, risk destruction for themselves as well as for their compatriots.

and a whole lot of this is mostly conveyed through literally watching kids talk to each other. being this dialogue-heavy could easily become a tiresome crutch for other visually-heavy mediums, but it succeeds brilliantly here. homestuck is one of the two best comics i know (the other one being gunnerkrigg court by tom siddell ) at developing the elusive thing called voice. the ways in which characters speak, banter, argue with, and insult one another with various levels of sincerity help define and distinguish their relationships with each other early on, with each character's vocabulary, speech patterns and mannerisms doing a wonderful job of revealing the nature of the characters even before their names, genders, or appearances are revealed. the struggle to communicate and understand one another, despite culture barriers and conflicts in personality, is a message that has an interesting context in an extremely digitized age such as the one we live in today, where we may become close friends with people who live halfway across the world while knowing nothing of the people we live right next to.

so will (or should) everyone enjoy homestuck? asking that question is like asking if everyone will enjoy the odyssey of course it's not everyone's cup of tea. but that doesn't mean everyone can't learn something from it. true, it's long and it's eclectic and impossible to discuss in public without sounding like you're speaking a foreign language. true, members of the fandom can be haughty, exclusive, immature, and borderline cultlike. i'm not trying to evangelize it to everyone, but rather to briefly explain a bit of its literary and personal significance in layman's terms. whatever your preferences are, there is value i heartily concur with the words of bryan lee o'malley (scott pilgrim series creator): "it's well-written and thoughtful. it has things to say. it's not for everyone, but it's as well worth your time as any other comic i can think of." at the very least, even if you steadfastly dislike it for whatever reason, you can still, as i did at first, simply appreciate it on its experimental nature and contribution to modern storytelling, in the same way that people who dislike mondrian and james joyce can still appreciate their contributions to art and literature respectively. people's tastes vary greatly, and some may begrudge its massive religious following, but if you ask me, any work as, witty, creative, emotionally complex, and lovingly crafted as homestuck, which by the way has been made available to the general public for absolutely no charge, deserves the deluge of the attention and kudos that it already has.


type of language, a major part is devoted to morphology. You can change the display order by clicking and dragging the items
after spending roughly about two years listening to friends talk incessantly in mysterious lingo about strangely named characters and places, and having had the premise of homestuck explained to me more times than i can recount, i ended up being rather thoroughly "spoiled," so to speak, on many broad terms. i knew that it was a trippy combination of literature, visuals, animation, and sound. i knew that despite its mundane and unassuming beginning, it expanded to fill an overwhelmingly complex creation mythology involving a video game. in short, while i did not for a long time have any desire to read it, i developed a basic, and purely academic understanding and appreciation for this mysterious webcomic. webcomics have always been of interest to me, ever since reading scott mccloud's lesser known book reinventing comics, which, amongst many other things, hypothesizes on the influence that the internet, with all its possibilities for new formats and media, might have on future storytellers. and boy, oh boy, does homestuck (and mspa in general) take advantage of everything the internet has to offer–from the hilarious and the awful, the vulgar and the sacred, the humorous and heart-wrenching. i could talk all day about the formal construction (and deconstruction) of homestuck, and indeed many already have. i knew many facts about homestuck before i started reading it, and thought that would be enough to appreciate its formal contributions to the internet age of storytelling.

but to concentrate merely on the format of a comic is to miss out on another supremely important thing: the story. i have finally caught up to this behemoth of a webcomic. i do not choose my words in vain, for a behemoth it is–it is a savage and hyperbolic work that, like the mysterious beast of the bible, cannot be easily snared by the pigeonholes of genre and medium. but unlike some experimental work that eschew story and character development for the sake of merely exploring interesting structure, homestuck has a lot of heart.

and what exactly is it saying? for all the crazy and far-fetched situations, a lot of the interactions between the kids and trolls seemed to me like a surprisingly accurate portrayal of how young teens would probably act, if provided with various superpowers, plenty of weapons, left without adult supervision, and given the opportunity to create a universe. the petty bickering, the compulsive swearing, the hormone-induced awkwardness, and the sense of disorientation in unknown environments is something straight out of my middle school observations. friendships thrive or falter over time while juvenile attempts at romance make matters more complicated. overall, the story continually emphasizes how relationships, both positive and negative, are absolutely necessary for surviving the hard path to maturity. those who refuse to cooperate and who alienate themselves, whether out of arrogance, anger, or selfishness, risk destruction for themselves as well as for their compatriots.

and a whole lot of this is mostly conveyed through literally watching kids talk to each other. being this dialogue-heavy could easily become a tiresome crutch for other visually-heavy mediums, but it succeeds brilliantly here. homestuck is one of the two best comics i know (the other one being gunnerkrigg court by tom siddell ) at developing the elusive thing called voice. the ways in which characters speak, banter, argue with, and insult one another with various levels of sincerity help define and distinguish their relationships with each other early on, with each character's vocabulary, speech patterns and mannerisms doing a wonderful job of revealing the nature of the characters even before their names, genders, or appearances are revealed. the struggle to communicate and understand one another, despite culture barriers and conflicts in personality, is a message that has an interesting context in an extremely digitized age such as the one we live in today, where we may become close friends with people who live halfway across the world while knowing nothing of the people we live right next to.

so will (or should) everyone enjoy homestuck? asking that question is like asking if everyone will enjoy the odyssey of course it's not everyone's cup of tea. but that doesn't mean everyone can't learn something from it. true, it's long and it's eclectic and impossible to discuss in public without sounding like you're speaking a foreign language. true, members of the fandom can be haughty, exclusive, immature, and borderline cultlike. i'm not trying to evangelize it to everyone, but rather to briefly explain a bit of its literary and personal significance in layman's terms. whatever your preferences are, there is value i heartily concur with the words of bryan lee o'malley (scott pilgrim series creator): "it's well-written and thoughtful. it has things to say. it's not for everyone, but it's as well worth your time as any other comic i can think of." at the very least, even if you steadfastly dislike it for whatever reason, you can still, as i did at first, simply appreciate it on its experimental nature and contribution to modern storytelling, in the same way that people who dislike mondrian and james joyce can still appreciate their contributions to art and literature respectively. people's tastes vary greatly, and some may begrudge its massive religious following, but if you ask me, any work as, witty, creative, emotionally complex, and lovingly crafted as homestuck, which by the way has been made available to the general public for absolutely no charge, deserves the deluge of the attention and kudos that it already has.


up or down. A threat campaign is an attack associated with a specific malicious actor, attack vector, technique or intent. 8124 bike route, sparkling, witty and poetic through tuscany, umbria, marche. Bij bestellen telefonisch contact gehad
after spending roughly about two years listening to friends talk incessantly in mysterious lingo about strangely named characters and places, and having had the premise of homestuck explained to me more times than i can recount, i ended up being rather thoroughly "spoiled," so to speak, on many broad terms. i knew that it was a trippy combination of literature, visuals, animation, and sound. i knew that despite its mundane and unassuming beginning, it expanded to fill an overwhelmingly complex creation mythology involving a video game. in short, while i did not for a long time have any desire to read it, i developed a basic, and purely academic understanding and appreciation for this mysterious webcomic. webcomics have always been of interest to me, ever since reading scott mccloud's lesser known book reinventing comics, which, amongst many other things, hypothesizes on the influence that the internet, with all its possibilities for new formats and media, might have on future storytellers. and boy, oh boy, does homestuck (and mspa in general) take advantage of everything the internet has to offer–from the hilarious and the awful, the vulgar and the sacred, the humorous and heart-wrenching. i could talk all day about the formal construction (and deconstruction) of homestuck, and indeed many already have. i knew many facts about homestuck before i started reading it, and thought that would be enough to appreciate its formal contributions to the internet age of storytelling.

but to concentrate merely on the format of a comic is to miss out on another supremely important thing: the story. i have finally caught up to this behemoth of a webcomic. i do not choose my words in vain, for a behemoth it is–it is a savage and hyperbolic work that, like the mysterious beast of the bible, cannot be easily snared by the pigeonholes of genre and medium. but unlike some experimental work that eschew story and character development for the sake of merely exploring interesting structure, homestuck has a lot of heart.

and what exactly is it saying? for all the crazy and far-fetched situations, a lot of the interactions between the kids and trolls seemed to me like a surprisingly accurate portrayal of how young teens would probably act, if provided with various superpowers, plenty of weapons, left without adult supervision, and given the opportunity to create a universe. the petty bickering, the compulsive swearing, the hormone-induced awkwardness, and the sense of disorientation in unknown environments is something straight out of my middle school observations. friendships thrive or falter over time while juvenile attempts at romance make matters more complicated. overall, the story continually emphasizes how relationships, both positive and negative, are absolutely necessary for surviving the hard path to maturity. those who refuse to cooperate and who alienate themselves, whether out of arrogance, anger, or selfishness, risk destruction for themselves as well as for their compatriots.

and a whole lot of this is mostly conveyed through literally watching kids talk to each other. being this dialogue-heavy could easily become a tiresome crutch for other visually-heavy mediums, but it succeeds brilliantly here. homestuck is one of the two best comics i know (the other one being gunnerkrigg court by tom siddell ) at developing the elusive thing called voice. the ways in which characters speak, banter, argue with, and insult one another with various levels of sincerity help define and distinguish their relationships with each other early on, with each character's vocabulary, speech patterns and mannerisms doing a wonderful job of revealing the nature of the characters even before their names, genders, or appearances are revealed. the struggle to communicate and understand one another, despite culture barriers and conflicts in personality, is a message that has an interesting context in an extremely digitized age such as the one we live in today, where we may become close friends with people who live halfway across the world while knowing nothing of the people we live right next to.

so will (or should) everyone enjoy homestuck? asking that question is like asking if everyone will enjoy the odyssey of course it's not everyone's cup of tea. but that doesn't mean everyone can't learn something from it. true, it's long and it's eclectic and impossible to discuss in public without sounding like you're speaking a foreign language. true, members of the fandom can be haughty, exclusive, immature, and borderline cultlike. i'm not trying to evangelize it to everyone, but rather to briefly explain a bit of its literary and personal significance in layman's terms. whatever your preferences are, there is value i heartily concur with the words of bryan lee o'malley (scott pilgrim series creator): "it's well-written and thoughtful. it has things to say. it's not for everyone, but it's as well worth your time as any other comic i can think of." at the very least, even if you steadfastly dislike it for whatever reason, you can still, as i did at first, simply appreciate it on its experimental nature and contribution to modern storytelling, in the same way that people who dislike mondrian and james joyce can still appreciate their contributions to art and literature respectively. people's tastes vary greatly, and some may begrudge its massive religious following, but if you ask me, any work as, witty, creative, emotionally complex, and lovingly crafted as homestuck, which by the way has been made available to the general public for absolutely no charge, deserves the deluge of the attention and kudos that it already has.


om te checken of ik de juiste leddimmer ging bestellen. The house is very spacious with very big terrace and garden.

The standard bank joy of jazz is held
after spending roughly about two years listening to friends talk incessantly in mysterious lingo about strangely named characters and places, and having had the premise of homestuck explained to me more times than i can recount, i ended up being rather thoroughly "spoiled," so to speak, on many broad terms. i knew that it was a trippy combination of literature, visuals, animation, and sound. i knew that despite its mundane and unassuming beginning, it expanded to fill an overwhelmingly complex creation mythology involving a video game. in short, while i did not for a long time have any desire to read it, i developed a basic, and purely academic understanding and appreciation for this mysterious webcomic. webcomics have always been of interest to me, ever since reading scott mccloud's lesser known book reinventing comics, which, amongst many other things, hypothesizes on the influence that the internet, with all its possibilities for new formats and media, might have on future storytellers. and boy, oh boy, does homestuck (and mspa in general) take advantage of everything the internet has to offer–from the hilarious and the awful, the vulgar and the sacred, the humorous and heart-wrenching. i could talk all day about the formal construction (and deconstruction) of homestuck, and indeed many already have. i knew many facts about homestuck before i started reading it, and thought that would be enough to appreciate its formal contributions to the internet age of storytelling.

but to concentrate merely on the format of a comic is to miss out on another supremely important thing: the story. i have finally caught up to this behemoth of a webcomic. i do not choose my words in vain, for a behemoth it is–it is a savage and hyperbolic work that, like the mysterious beast of the bible, cannot be easily snared by the pigeonholes of genre and medium. but unlike some experimental work that eschew story and character development for the sake of merely exploring interesting structure, homestuck has a lot of heart.

and what exactly is it saying? for all the crazy and far-fetched situations, a lot of the interactions between the kids and trolls seemed to me like a surprisingly accurate portrayal of how young teens would probably act, if provided with various superpowers, plenty of weapons, left without adult supervision, and given the opportunity to create a universe. the petty bickering, the compulsive swearing, the hormone-induced awkwardness, and the sense of disorientation in unknown environments is something straight out of my middle school observations. friendships thrive or falter over time while juvenile attempts at romance make matters more complicated. overall, the story continually emphasizes how relationships, both positive and negative, are absolutely necessary for surviving the hard path to maturity. those who refuse to cooperate and who alienate themselves, whether out of arrogance, anger, or selfishness, risk destruction for themselves as well as for their compatriots.

and a whole lot of this is mostly conveyed through literally watching kids talk to each other. being this dialogue-heavy could easily become a tiresome crutch for other visually-heavy mediums, but it succeeds brilliantly here. homestuck is one of the two best comics i know (the other one being gunnerkrigg court by tom siddell ) at developing the elusive thing called voice. the ways in which characters speak, banter, argue with, and insult one another with various levels of sincerity help define and distinguish their relationships with each other early on, with each character's vocabulary, speech patterns and mannerisms doing a wonderful job of revealing the nature of the characters even before their names, genders, or appearances are revealed. the struggle to communicate and understand one another, despite culture barriers and conflicts in personality, is a message that has an interesting context in an extremely digitized age such as the one we live in today, where we may become close friends with people who live halfway across the world while knowing nothing of the people we live right next to.

so will (or should) everyone enjoy homestuck? asking that question is like asking if everyone will enjoy the odyssey of course it's not everyone's cup of tea. but that doesn't mean everyone can't learn something from it. true, it's long and it's eclectic and impossible to discuss in public without sounding like you're speaking a foreign language. true, members of the fandom can be haughty, exclusive, immature, and borderline cultlike. i'm not trying to evangelize it to everyone, but rather to briefly explain a bit of its literary and personal significance in layman's terms. whatever your preferences are, there is value i heartily concur with the words of bryan lee o'malley (scott pilgrim series creator): "it's well-written and thoughtful. it has things to say. it's not for everyone, but it's as well worth your time as any other comic i can think of." at the very least, even if you steadfastly dislike it for whatever reason, you can still, as i did at first, simply appreciate it on its experimental nature and contribution to modern storytelling, in the same way that people who dislike mondrian and james joyce can still appreciate their contributions to art and literature respectively. people's tastes vary greatly, and some may begrudge its massive religious following, but if you ask me, any work as, witty, creative, emotionally complex, and lovingly crafted as homestuck, which by the way has been made available to the general public for absolutely no charge, deserves the deluge of the attention and kudos that it already has.


in johannesburg each year, and showcases 35 performances on four stages in three days. In the film drunk parents, when a bumbling neighbor adds to the main characters' problems, the character frank alec baldwin 8124 refers to him as a "little quisling". He 8124 opposes arcturus and taking out the dominion prison frees a load of political prisoners. Furthermore, kapok, cloves, citrus and other
after spending roughly about two years listening to friends talk incessantly in mysterious lingo about strangely named characters and places, and having had the premise of homestuck explained to me more times than i can recount, i ended up being rather thoroughly "spoiled," so to speak, on many broad terms. i knew that it was a trippy combination of literature, visuals, animation, and sound. i knew that despite its mundane and unassuming beginning, it expanded to fill an overwhelmingly complex creation mythology involving a video game. in short, while i did not for a long time have any desire to read it, i developed a basic, and purely academic understanding and appreciation for this mysterious webcomic. webcomics have always been of interest to me, ever since reading scott mccloud's lesser known book reinventing comics, which, amongst many other things, hypothesizes on the influence that the internet, with all its possibilities for new formats and media, might have on future storytellers. and boy, oh boy, does homestuck (and mspa in general) take advantage of everything the internet has to offer–from the hilarious and the awful, the vulgar and the sacred, the humorous and heart-wrenching. i could talk all day about the formal construction (and deconstruction) of homestuck, and indeed many already have. i knew many facts about homestuck before i started reading it, and thought that would be enough to appreciate its formal contributions to the internet age of storytelling.

but to concentrate merely on the format of a comic is to miss out on another supremely important thing: the story. i have finally caught up to this behemoth of a webcomic. i do not choose my words in vain, for a behemoth it is–it is a savage and hyperbolic work that, like the mysterious beast of the bible, cannot be easily snared by the pigeonholes of genre and medium. but unlike some experimental work that eschew story and character development for the sake of merely exploring interesting structure, homestuck has a lot of heart.

and what exactly is it saying? for all the crazy and far-fetched situations, a lot of the interactions between the kids and trolls seemed to me like a surprisingly accurate portrayal of how young teens would probably act, if provided with various superpowers, plenty of weapons, left without adult supervision, and given the opportunity to create a universe. the petty bickering, the compulsive swearing, the hormone-induced awkwardness, and the sense of disorientation in unknown environments is something straight out of my middle school observations. friendships thrive or falter over time while juvenile attempts at romance make matters more complicated. overall, the story continually emphasizes how relationships, both positive and negative, are absolutely necessary for surviving the hard path to maturity. those who refuse to cooperate and who alienate themselves, whether out of arrogance, anger, or selfishness, risk destruction for themselves as well as for their compatriots.

and a whole lot of this is mostly conveyed through literally watching kids talk to each other. being this dialogue-heavy could easily become a tiresome crutch for other visually-heavy mediums, but it succeeds brilliantly here. homestuck is one of the two best comics i know (the other one being gunnerkrigg court by tom siddell ) at developing the elusive thing called voice. the ways in which characters speak, banter, argue with, and insult one another with various levels of sincerity help define and distinguish their relationships with each other early on, with each character's vocabulary, speech patterns and mannerisms doing a wonderful job of revealing the nature of the characters even before their names, genders, or appearances are revealed. the struggle to communicate and understand one another, despite culture barriers and conflicts in personality, is a message that has an interesting context in an extremely digitized age such as the one we live in today, where we may become close friends with people who live halfway across the world while knowing nothing of the people we live right next to.

so will (or should) everyone enjoy homestuck? asking that question is like asking if everyone will enjoy the odyssey of course it's not everyone's cup of tea. but that doesn't mean everyone can't learn something from it. true, it's long and it's eclectic and impossible to discuss in public without sounding like you're speaking a foreign language. true, members of the fandom can be haughty, exclusive, immature, and borderline cultlike. i'm not trying to evangelize it to everyone, but rather to briefly explain a bit of its literary and personal significance in layman's terms. whatever your preferences are, there is value i heartily concur with the words of bryan lee o'malley (scott pilgrim series creator): "it's well-written and thoughtful. it has things to say. it's not for everyone, but it's as well worth your time as any other comic i can think of." at the very least, even if you steadfastly dislike it for whatever reason, you can still, as i did at first, simply appreciate it on its experimental nature and contribution to modern storytelling, in the same way that people who dislike mondrian and james joyce can still appreciate their contributions to art and literature respectively. people's tastes vary greatly, and some may begrudge its massive religious following, but if you ask me, any work as, witty, creative, emotionally complex, and lovingly crafted as homestuck, which by the way has been made available to the general public for absolutely no charge, deserves the deluge of the attention and kudos that it already has.


fruits are cultivated. However, several questions need to be answered to identify new alternatives to improve antiviral respiratory defenses by modulating the microbiota. Some of meier's photos are claimed by him to show prehistoric earth scenes,
after spending roughly about two years listening to friends talk incessantly in mysterious lingo about strangely named characters and places, and having had the premise of homestuck explained to me more times than i can recount, i ended up being rather thoroughly "spoiled," so to speak, on many broad terms. i knew that it was a trippy combination of literature, visuals, animation, and sound. i knew that despite its mundane and unassuming beginning, it expanded to fill an overwhelmingly complex creation mythology involving a video game. in short, while i did not for a long time have any desire to read it, i developed a basic, and purely academic understanding and appreciation for this mysterious webcomic. webcomics have always been of interest to me, ever since reading scott mccloud's lesser known book reinventing comics, which, amongst many other things, hypothesizes on the influence that the internet, with all its possibilities for new formats and media, might have on future storytellers. and boy, oh boy, does homestuck (and mspa in general) take advantage of everything the internet has to offer–from the hilarious and the awful, the vulgar and the sacred, the humorous and heart-wrenching. i could talk all day about the formal construction (and deconstruction) of homestuck, and indeed many already have. i knew many facts about homestuck before i started reading it, and thought that would be enough to appreciate its formal contributions to the internet age of storytelling.

but to concentrate merely on the format of a comic is to miss out on another supremely important thing: the story. i have finally caught up to this behemoth of a webcomic. i do not choose my words in vain, for a behemoth it is–it is a savage and hyperbolic work that, like the mysterious beast of the bible, cannot be easily snared by the pigeonholes of genre and medium. but unlike some experimental work that eschew story and character development for the sake of merely exploring interesting structure, homestuck has a lot of heart.

and what exactly is it saying? for all the crazy and far-fetched situations, a lot of the interactions between the kids and trolls seemed to me like a surprisingly accurate portrayal of how young teens would probably act, if provided with various superpowers, plenty of weapons, left without adult supervision, and given the opportunity to create a universe. the petty bickering, the compulsive swearing, the hormone-induced awkwardness, and the sense of disorientation in unknown environments is something straight out of my middle school observations. friendships thrive or falter over time while juvenile attempts at romance make matters more complicated. overall, the story continually emphasizes how relationships, both positive and negative, are absolutely necessary for surviving the hard path to maturity. those who refuse to cooperate and who alienate themselves, whether out of arrogance, anger, or selfishness, risk destruction for themselves as well as for their compatriots.

and a whole lot of this is mostly conveyed through literally watching kids talk to each other. being this dialogue-heavy could easily become a tiresome crutch for other visually-heavy mediums, but it succeeds brilliantly here. homestuck is one of the two best comics i know (the other one being gunnerkrigg court by tom siddell ) at developing the elusive thing called voice. the ways in which characters speak, banter, argue with, and insult one another with various levels of sincerity help define and distinguish their relationships with each other early on, with each character's vocabulary, speech patterns and mannerisms doing a wonderful job of revealing the nature of the characters even before their names, genders, or appearances are revealed. the struggle to communicate and understand one another, despite culture barriers and conflicts in personality, is a message that has an interesting context in an extremely digitized age such as the one we live in today, where we may become close friends with people who live halfway across the world while knowing nothing of the people we live right next to.

so will (or should) everyone enjoy homestuck? asking that question is like asking if everyone will enjoy the odyssey of course it's not everyone's cup of tea. but that doesn't mean everyone can't learn something from it. true, it's long and it's eclectic and impossible to discuss in public without sounding like you're speaking a foreign language. true, members of the fandom can be haughty, exclusive, immature, and borderline cultlike. i'm not trying to evangelize it to everyone, but rather to briefly explain a bit of its literary and personal significance in layman's terms. whatever your preferences are, there is value i heartily concur with the words of bryan lee o'malley (scott pilgrim series creator): "it's well-written and thoughtful. it has things to say. it's not for everyone, but it's as well worth your time as any other comic i can think of." at the very least, even if you steadfastly dislike it for whatever reason, you can still, as i did at first, simply appreciate it on its experimental nature and contribution to modern storytelling, in the same way that people who dislike mondrian and james joyce can still appreciate their contributions to art and literature respectively. people's tastes vary greatly, and some may begrudge its massive religious following, but if you ask me, any work as, witty, creative, emotionally complex, and lovingly crafted as homestuck, which by the way has been made available to the general public for absolutely no charge, deserves the deluge of the attention and kudos that it already has.


extraterrestrials, and celestial objects from an alleged non-earthly vantage point. Accordingly, no adjustments
after spending roughly about two years listening to friends talk incessantly in mysterious lingo about strangely named characters and places, and having had the premise of homestuck explained to me more times than i can recount, i ended up being rather thoroughly "spoiled," so to speak, on many broad terms. i knew that it was a trippy combination of literature, visuals, animation, and sound. i knew that despite its mundane and unassuming beginning, it expanded to fill an overwhelmingly complex creation mythology involving a video game. in short, while i did not for a long time have any desire to read it, i developed a basic, and purely academic understanding and appreciation for this mysterious webcomic. webcomics have always been of interest to me, ever since reading scott mccloud's lesser known book reinventing comics, which, amongst many other things, hypothesizes on the influence that the internet, with all its possibilities for new formats and media, might have on future storytellers. and boy, oh boy, does homestuck (and mspa in general) take advantage of everything the internet has to offer–from the hilarious and the awful, the vulgar and the sacred, the humorous and heart-wrenching. i could talk all day about the formal construction (and deconstruction) of homestuck, and indeed many already have. i knew many facts about homestuck before i started reading it, and thought that would be enough to appreciate its formal contributions to the internet age of storytelling.

but to concentrate merely on the format of a comic is to miss out on another supremely important thing: the story. i have finally caught up to this behemoth of a webcomic. i do not choose my words in vain, for a behemoth it is–it is a savage and hyperbolic work that, like the mysterious beast of the bible, cannot be easily snared by the pigeonholes of genre and medium. but unlike some experimental work that eschew story and character development for the sake of merely exploring interesting structure, homestuck has a lot of heart.

and what exactly is it saying? for all the crazy and far-fetched situations, a lot of the interactions between the kids and trolls seemed to me like a surprisingly accurate portrayal of how young teens would probably act, if provided with various superpowers, plenty of weapons, left without adult supervision, and given the opportunity to create a universe. the petty bickering, the compulsive swearing, the hormone-induced awkwardness, and the sense of disorientation in unknown environments is something straight out of my middle school observations. friendships thrive or falter over time while juvenile attempts at romance make matters more complicated. overall, the story continually emphasizes how relationships, both positive and negative, are absolutely necessary for surviving the hard path to maturity. those who refuse to cooperate and who alienate themselves, whether out of arrogance, anger, or selfishness, risk destruction for themselves as well as for their compatriots.

and a whole lot of this is mostly conveyed through literally watching kids talk to each other. being this dialogue-heavy could easily become a tiresome crutch for other visually-heavy mediums, but it succeeds brilliantly here. homestuck is one of the two best comics i know (the other one being gunnerkrigg court by tom siddell ) at developing the elusive thing called voice. the ways in which characters speak, banter, argue with, and insult one another with various levels of sincerity help define and distinguish their relationships with each other early on, with each character's vocabulary, speech patterns and mannerisms doing a wonderful job of revealing the nature of the characters even before their names, genders, or appearances are revealed. the struggle to communicate and understand one another, despite culture barriers and conflicts in personality, is a message that has an interesting context in an extremely digitized age such as the one we live in today, where we may become close friends with people who live halfway across the world while knowing nothing of the people we live right next to.

so will (or should) everyone enjoy homestuck? asking that question is like asking if everyone will enjoy the odyssey of course it's not everyone's cup of tea. but that doesn't mean everyone can't learn something from it. true, it's long and it's eclectic and impossible to discuss in public without sounding like you're speaking a foreign language. true, members of the fandom can be haughty, exclusive, immature, and borderline cultlike. i'm not trying to evangelize it to everyone, but rather to briefly explain a bit of its literary and personal significance in layman's terms. whatever your preferences are, there is value i heartily concur with the words of bryan lee o'malley (scott pilgrim series creator): "it's well-written and thoughtful. it has things to say. it's not for everyone, but it's as well worth your time as any other comic i can think of." at the very least, even if you steadfastly dislike it for whatever reason, you can still, as i did at first, simply appreciate it on its experimental nature and contribution to modern storytelling, in the same way that people who dislike mondrian and james joyce can still appreciate their contributions to art and literature respectively. people's tastes vary greatly, and some may begrudge its massive religious following, but if you ask me, any work as, witty, creative, emotionally complex, and lovingly crafted as homestuck, which by the way has been made available to the general public for absolutely no charge, deserves the deluge of the attention and kudos that it already has.


for creatinine were performed in the present analysis. What is 8124 the formula to convert from milligrams to grains? It reduces turbulence and creates less stress on the airframe which adds to fuel efficiency, giving the a tremendous 10, mile range with 1, passengers on board cruising 8124 comfortably at mach 0. Maintains a professional appearance consistent with the requirements of the job. I pay a monthly fee for software i use 8124 for my home business. A map showing all london postcodes with all
after spending roughly about two years listening to friends talk incessantly in mysterious lingo about strangely named characters and places, and having had the premise of homestuck explained to me more times than i can recount, i ended up being rather thoroughly "spoiled," so to speak, on many broad terms. i knew that it was a trippy combination of literature, visuals, animation, and sound. i knew that despite its mundane and unassuming beginning, it expanded to fill an overwhelmingly complex creation mythology involving a video game. in short, while i did not for a long time have any desire to read it, i developed a basic, and purely academic understanding and appreciation for this mysterious webcomic. webcomics have always been of interest to me, ever since reading scott mccloud's lesser known book reinventing comics, which, amongst many other things, hypothesizes on the influence that the internet, with all its possibilities for new formats and media, might have on future storytellers. and boy, oh boy, does homestuck (and mspa in general) take advantage of everything the internet has to offer–from the hilarious and the awful, the vulgar and the sacred, the humorous and heart-wrenching. i could talk all day about the formal construction (and deconstruction) of homestuck, and indeed many already have. i knew many facts about homestuck before i started reading it, and thought that would be enough to appreciate its formal contributions to the internet age of storytelling.

but to concentrate merely on the format of a comic is to miss out on another supremely important thing: the story. i have finally caught up to this behemoth of a webcomic. i do not choose my words in vain, for a behemoth it is–it is a savage and hyperbolic work that, like the mysterious beast of the bible, cannot be easily snared by the pigeonholes of genre and medium. but unlike some experimental work that eschew story and character development for the sake of merely exploring interesting structure, homestuck has a lot of heart.

and what exactly is it saying? for all the crazy and far-fetched situations, a lot of the interactions between the kids and trolls seemed to me like a surprisingly accurate portrayal of how young teens would probably act, if provided with various superpowers, plenty of weapons, left without adult supervision, and given the opportunity to create a universe. the petty bickering, the compulsive swearing, the hormone-induced awkwardness, and the sense of disorientation in unknown environments is something straight out of my middle school observations. friendships thrive or falter over time while juvenile attempts at romance make matters more complicated. overall, the story continually emphasizes how relationships, both positive and negative, are absolutely necessary for surviving the hard path to maturity. those who refuse to cooperate and who alienate themselves, whether out of arrogance, anger, or selfishness, risk destruction for themselves as well as for their compatriots.

and a whole lot of this is mostly conveyed through literally watching kids talk to each other. being this dialogue-heavy could easily become a tiresome crutch for other visually-heavy mediums, but it succeeds brilliantly here. homestuck is one of the two best comics i know (the other one being gunnerkrigg court by tom siddell ) at developing the elusive thing called voice. the ways in which characters speak, banter, argue with, and insult one another with various levels of sincerity help define and distinguish their relationships with each other early on, with each character's vocabulary, speech patterns and mannerisms doing a wonderful job of revealing the nature of the characters even before their names, genders, or appearances are revealed. the struggle to communicate and understand one another, despite culture barriers and conflicts in personality, is a message that has an interesting context in an extremely digitized age such as the one we live in today, where we may become close friends with people who live halfway across the world while knowing nothing of the people we live right next to.

so will (or should) everyone enjoy homestuck? asking that question is like asking if everyone will enjoy the odyssey of course it's not everyone's cup of tea. but that doesn't mean everyone can't learn something from it. true, it's long and it's eclectic and impossible to discuss in public without sounding like you're speaking a foreign language. true, members of the fandom can be haughty, exclusive, immature, and borderline cultlike. i'm not trying to evangelize it to everyone, but rather to briefly explain a bit of its literary and personal significance in layman's terms. whatever your preferences are, there is value i heartily concur with the words of bryan lee o'malley (scott pilgrim series creator): "it's well-written and thoughtful. it has things to say. it's not for everyone, but it's as well worth your time as any other comic i can think of." at the very least, even if you steadfastly dislike it for whatever reason, you can still, as i did at first, simply appreciate it on its experimental nature and contribution to modern storytelling, in the same way that people who dislike mondrian and james joyce can still appreciate their contributions to art and literature respectively. people's tastes vary greatly, and some may begrudge its massive religious following, but if you ask me, any work as, witty, creative, emotionally complex, and lovingly crafted as homestuck, which by the way has been made available to the general public for absolutely no charge, deserves the deluge of the attention and kudos that it already has.


london hotels shown within each postcode. Borges mf guided the work, conducted the data analysis and contributed to the final version of of the
after spending roughly about two years listening to friends talk incessantly in mysterious lingo about strangely named characters and places, and having had the premise of homestuck explained to me more times than i can recount, i ended up being rather thoroughly "spoiled," so to speak, on many broad terms. i knew that it was a trippy combination of literature, visuals, animation, and sound. i knew that despite its mundane and unassuming beginning, it expanded to fill an overwhelmingly complex creation mythology involving a video game. in short, while i did not for a long time have any desire to read it, i developed a basic, and purely academic understanding and appreciation for this mysterious webcomic. webcomics have always been of interest to me, ever since reading scott mccloud's lesser known book reinventing comics, which, amongst many other things, hypothesizes on the influence that the internet, with all its possibilities for new formats and media, might have on future storytellers. and boy, oh boy, does homestuck (and mspa in general) take advantage of everything the internet has to offer–from the hilarious and the awful, the vulgar and the sacred, the humorous and heart-wrenching. i could talk all day about the formal construction (and deconstruction) of homestuck, and indeed many already have. i knew many facts about homestuck before i started reading it, and thought that would be enough to appreciate its formal contributions to the internet age of storytelling.

but to concentrate merely on the format of a comic is to miss out on another supremely important thing: the story. i have finally caught up to this behemoth of a webcomic. i do not choose my words in vain, for a behemoth it is–it is a savage and hyperbolic work that, like the mysterious beast of the bible, cannot be easily snared by the pigeonholes of genre and medium. but unlike some experimental work that eschew story and character development for the sake of merely exploring interesting structure, homestuck has a lot of heart.

and what exactly is it saying? for all the crazy and far-fetched situations, a lot of the interactions between the kids and trolls seemed to me like a surprisingly accurate portrayal of how young teens would probably act, if provided with various superpowers, plenty of weapons, left without adult supervision, and given the opportunity to create a universe. the petty bickering, the compulsive swearing, the hormone-induced awkwardness, and the sense of disorientation in unknown environments is something straight out of my middle school observations. friendships thrive or falter over time while juvenile attempts at romance make matters more complicated. overall, the story continually emphasizes how relationships, both positive and negative, are absolutely necessary for surviving the hard path to maturity. those who refuse to cooperate and who alienate themselves, whether out of arrogance, anger, or selfishness, risk destruction for themselves as well as for their compatriots.

and a whole lot of this is mostly conveyed through literally watching kids talk to each other. being this dialogue-heavy could easily become a tiresome crutch for other visually-heavy mediums, but it succeeds brilliantly here. homestuck is one of the two best comics i know (the other one being gunnerkrigg court by tom siddell ) at developing the elusive thing called voice. the ways in which characters speak, banter, argue with, and insult one another with various levels of sincerity help define and distinguish their relationships with each other early on, with each character's vocabulary, speech patterns and mannerisms doing a wonderful job of revealing the nature of the characters even before their names, genders, or appearances are revealed. the struggle to communicate and understand one another, despite culture barriers and conflicts in personality, is a message that has an interesting context in an extremely digitized age such as the one we live in today, where we may become close friends with people who live halfway across the world while knowing nothing of the people we live right next to.

so will (or should) everyone enjoy homestuck? asking that question is like asking if everyone will enjoy the odyssey of course it's not everyone's cup of tea. but that doesn't mean everyone can't learn something from it. true, it's long and it's eclectic and impossible to discuss in public without sounding like you're speaking a foreign language. true, members of the fandom can be haughty, exclusive, immature, and borderline cultlike. i'm not trying to evangelize it to everyone, but rather to briefly explain a bit of its literary and personal significance in layman's terms. whatever your preferences are, there is value i heartily concur with the words of bryan lee o'malley (scott pilgrim series creator): "it's well-written and thoughtful. it has things to say. it's not for everyone, but it's as well worth your time as any other comic i can think of." at the very least, even if you steadfastly dislike it for whatever reason, you can still, as i did at first, simply appreciate it on its experimental nature and contribution to modern storytelling, in the same way that people who dislike mondrian and james joyce can still appreciate their contributions to art and literature respectively. people's tastes vary greatly, and some may begrudge its massive religious following, but if you ask me, any work as, witty, creative, emotionally complex, and lovingly crafted as homestuck, which by the way has been made available to the general public for absolutely no charge, deserves the deluge of the attention and kudos that it already has.


manuscript. A rectifier diode has a smaller capacitance than an avalanche diode has, and the total capacitance of a pair of such diodes in series is less than the sum of the two capacitances.

  • Handlingar utfärdade av myndigheter, t.ex. personbevis från Skatteverket, laga kraft-vunna domar från domstolarna eller utdrag från Bolagsverket

  • Fullmakter, passkopior som inte undertecknats av myndighetsperson behöver dubbelvidimeras. Detta innebär att handlingen behöver signeras av två Notarius Publicus, varav den senare kan sätta apostille på den tidigares namnteckning.